Nutritional Therapy: Support for those diagnosed or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes

As Theresa May becomes our new Prime Minister many people have said that we don’t know that much about her. But one thing which we do know is that she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2012. This type of diabetes is rarer than Type 2 especially when diagnosed later in life. However, let’s hope that she brings some attention to diabetes overall. Type 2 is a significant health issue and is on the rise, increasing by 65 per cent over the past decade. There are also thought to be 549,000 people with un-diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. It costs the NHS £10 billion a year and this is set to rise. This cost is incurred mainly in dealing with the complications of the condition such as amputations, blindness, kidney failure and stroke. However this is nothing to the human cost in suffering that these complications bring. As the number of people living with Type 2 diabetes escalates, Diabetes UK is warning that the need for the NHS to commit to providing adequate care and diabetes education across the UK is more urgent than ever. Until this happens – and the National Audit Office recently criticised the often poor standard of care – large numbers of people will end up experiencing potentially preventable diabetes-related complications. At the moment, more than 24,000 people a year with diabetes die before their time, which is because: Only 60 per cent of people with diabetes are getting the eight NICE recommended checks [2], which are key to identifying any problems early enough to prevent complications. Diabetes education courses are not being commissioned for...